CNJUR: Kids Urban Thinkers Lab Puebla, México. My City, My Rights

CNJUR: Kids Urban Thinkers Lab Puebla, México. My City, My Rights

On April 8, 2017 was held in the city of Puebla, Mexico, the Kids Urban Lab "My City, My Rights", organized by CNJUR International, as an event linked to the "Kids Urban Thinkers Campus Riobamba Ecuador”, of the World Urban Campaign.
 
 
In the facilities of the Municipal Planning Institute of the City of Puebla, Mexico - The Cultural Heritage of Humanity- Mexican boys and girls from 10 to 18 years, participated in this event focused on the legal implementation of the Habitat III, for children and youth people.
Is there urban planning and designed for and from children? The unanimous response of the small assistants has been "NO". However, children are key actors in building The City We Need and want. Children are able to exercise and claim their Right to the City, by themselves.
 
 
The obligation of the adults is to provide them with the tools to enable them to exercise their rights. On the other hand, in the sessions of Kids Urban Lab, it was emphasized that the fundamental rights of children are violated.
In the Kids Urban Lab, the following activities and approaches were carried out:
  • Connection with the Universe: All human beings are connected.
  •  
 
What are the elements of true legal urbanism?
1) Feel the City.
2) The City moves.
2.1) The cities are living beings, have stages: are born, grow, live, die, and sometimes they are born again.
3) Discover the spirit of the place.
  • The law is something that is breathed. It is very important for everyone to know the legal framework, which involves us in the cities.
  • We need to know our 9 senses to perceive the world:
1) View.
2) Ear.
3) Taste.
4) Touch.
5) Smell.
6) Mind. -> (brain, thoughts)
7) Intuition. -> (Feeling, sixth sense, not looks, feels)
8) Spirit. -> (Connection with a divine being, spiritual, love)
9) Consciousness. (When all the senses are in harmony.)
 
 
In the field of urban planning: an analysis of the urban mapping of St. Petersburg, Russia; New York, United States; Riviera Maya, Mexico; Berlin, Germany; Rome, Italy; Puebla, Mexico; to detect similarities between cities, as well as understanding of the legal concept of land uses and destinations, the importance of mobility and public space.
The children and young people took an exercise to answer: What I like and don't like, the city where I live? The cities they chose to live according to this analysis were: St. Petersburg, Berlin, the Mayan Riviera and the city where they currently reside.
The authorities of the Municipal Institute Planning of Puebla, (IMPLAN, acronym in Spanish) made an exhibition for children, of the activities carried out by the authority to plan the city, the problems that have the metropolitan area of the city of Puebla, and the explanation of what is an Urban Development Program, as a legal instrument created by all, for all.
 
 
Also, a tour of the Historical Center of the City of Puebla, to detect urban landmarks, identify cultural heritage, detect problems of mobility, equipment, urban image, billboards, urban risk and vulnerability.
Likewise, the children constituted a deliberative assembly, where they proposed the characteristics of the city we want, the ideas and proposals from the children to make their city, and the aspects to be improved in the city where they live.
Finally, the mexican children sent a greeting to the children and young people of Ecuador, receiving the gifts that the delegation of that country sent to Mexico on the occasion of his participation in the Conference Habitat III in October last year.
 
 
The City belongs to everyone, and this means that children are also owners of the City: Now they know that not taking into account their participation to decide the future of their city, violates their rights, and that the Law is the means to enforce the right to the city, based on the Charter of the United Nations as a right of children.

Article by Urban Lawyer PABLO AGUILAR GONZÁLEZ // Judith Aguilar Moreno
Photo Credits: Othón Osorio (CC)