Urban Solutions

                                                              

Urban Solutions

URBAN SOLUTIONS are initiatives, practices, policies, legislations and models that address urban challenges and constitute effective responses to The City We Need. They are articulated around ten drivers of changes: ''Governance and Partnerships'', ''Planning and Design'', ''Finance'', ''Land, Housing and Services'', ''Environment'', ''Health and Safety'', ''Economy and Livelihoods'', ''Education'', ''Technology'' and ''Monitoring and Evaluation''.
A new call for Urban Solutions opened on Monday 2 October 2017 during the celebrations of the World Habitat Day. Submissions for urban solutions will be open up to 31 December 2017 through an online portal (see below):

#URBAN SOLUTIONS : (EDITION 1 - 2016)

The list below is a selection of Urban Solutions submitted by WUC partners and their affiliates before March 2016. Urban Solutions illustrate how the drivers of change can be implemented, either locally or in multiple contexts. Most of them have already been applied, some tested only.

Driver 1: Governance and Partnerships

Local governments are institutional drivers of city development. They require adequate means to operate through a large degree of autonomy, flexibility and creativity to design, plan, manage and deliver The City We Need, in relation with other tiers of government.

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Driver 2: Planning and Design

Urban planning and design are cornerstones of The City We Need, and should help realize the principles for the city we need through spatial visioning and strategic planning supported by policies, tools, institutional and participatory mechanisms and regulatory procedures. The City We Need incorporates a participatory and deliberative process that mainstreams the gender perspective, and the needs and interests of different age groups and people with different impairments.

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Driver 3: Finance

The development of effective finance and funding models is a prerequisite to the building of The City We Need. Central governments should adopt transparent and predictable systems for inter- governmental grants and subsidies to enhance the financial independence of local authorities. However, collaboration of multiple levels of government is required for coordinated investment strategies, including accessing and leveraging private finance and where appropriate mechanisms such as municipal bonds.

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Driver 4: Land, Housing and Services

A rights-based approach and social justice agenda should be institutionalized that ensures access and commitment to land, housing, and services for all. Cities should adopt innovative and flexible approaches to extend the delivery of these to all of its inhabitants.

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Driver 5: Environment

In order to address the regenerative city imperative, all producers and users of the city need to find ways to protect and foster the restoration of natural systems from which they draw resources.

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Driver 6: Health and Safety

Cohesive and dedicated multi-sectoral policies are required at national, regional and local government levels in order to realize the health, safety and well-being paradigm in The City We Need.

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Driver 7: Economy and Livelihoods

In the context of growing inequalities worldwide, the livelihoods and quality of life for low- income groups and deprived urban areas must be a priority for all public, private, and social actors.

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Driver 8: Education

Education is the foundation to an inclusive city that learns and innovates. Dialogue is a key driver of knowledge sharing communities. Evidence-based policy dialogue and analysis is a major catalyst for mobilizing all those involved in formal and civic education and for stimulating new methods of participation and collective empowerment.

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Driver 9: Technology

New technologies are more than just devices or applications. New technologies for the City We Need come from the collective intelligence of societies. Top-down or supply-driven approaches to the “smart city” and the use of technologies will not result in the ownership and buy-in required for making lasting changes. The basis for use of technologies to improve living conditions and quality of life lies in proper identification of what people need and people’s involvement in the change process. Innovations make cities smarter not because they are “smarter” but because they are tap into the creativity of communities.

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Driver 10: Monitoring and Evaluation

Access to open data is fundamental for a balanced system. Just as data is collected on urban dwellers from both public and private actors, urban dwellers should have the ability and to collect, analyze and access data on public authorities and the private sector.

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